security
A Scary New Kind of Malware Is Invading Banks All Over the World

Few terms in the security world instil more fear than Stuxnet. But seven years after the infamous computer worm that targeted Iran’s nuclear facilities was discovered, an ugly descendant of the software is showing up in banks and other organisations around the globe. Read More >>

hacking
Hackers Are Using Infected USB Drives to Attack Critical Infrastructure 

Government-sponsored hackers are using a clever trick to attack critical infrastructure like nuclear power plants, dams, and oil refineries. According to Eric Knapp, chief cybersecurity engineer at Honeywell, one third of malware found in critical infrastructure came from USB drives plugged in by users. Read More >>

hacking
Cyberattack Causes Real-Life Chaos at a German Steel Mill

At this point, it's obvious that cyberattacks can have devastating, far-reaching consequences. Look at the fallout from the Sony hack. But it's still a rarity for digital aggression campaigns to cause direct physical damage, which is why a recent cyberattack that screwed with a blast furnace at a German steel mill is so disturbing. Read More >>

hacking
Report: Iran Has Been Hacking Major Infrastructure for Last Two Years

Last year, we discovered that Iranian hackers had breached Navy computer systems, which sent an understandable wave of panic through the administration. But it looks like that might've just been the tip of a much bigger, more sophisticated and more deadly iceberg. Read More >>

security
Did a USB Stick Infect a Russian Nuclear Plant with Stuxnet?

There's a common misconception that you need to be connected to the internet to get infected with malware. Well, that's not true, and according to renowned cybersecurity expert Eugene Kaspersky, the folks at a nuclear power plant in Russia learned this the hard way. Read More >>

hackers
An Unknown Hacker Group Claims That It Shut Down the World’s Largest Oil Company — and That They’ll Do It Again

The NY Times is reporting that unknown computer hackers who call themselves "Cutting Sword of Justice" have claimed responsibility for spreading a malicious virus into Saudi Aramco, the Saudi government-owned oil company that's also the world's largest, and destroying three-quarters of all its computers. The hackers used a similar virus as the government created virus, Flame. Read More >>

internet
Iran Is Quitting the Internet Because It’s Afraid of America

After being dominated by weaponised trojan horses on two different occasions, nuclear loudmouth Iran says it's had enough: it's unplugging from the Internet, hiding, and making its own. Read More >>

security
Flame Hijacks Microsoft Update to Spread Malware Disguised As Legit Code

It's a scenario security researchers have long worried about, a man-in-the-middle attack that allows someone to impersonate Microsoft Update to deliver malware - disguised as legitimate Microsoft code - to unsuspecting users. Read More >>

security
Meet ‘Flame’, The Massive Spy Malware Infiltrating Iranian Computers

A massive, highly sophisticated piece of malware has been newly found infecting systems in Iran and elsewhere and is believed to be part of a well-coordinated, ongoing, state-run cyberespionage operation. Read More >>

hacking
There’s a New Version of the Stuxnet-esque Duqu Trojan Floating Around and Nobody Knows What It Does

A newly surfaced version of the Duqu trojan indicates that the authors of one of the most sophisticated computer worms in recent memory are aggressively trying to figure out how to attack their next target. Read More >>

hacking
Whoever Wrote the Duqu Trojan’s Framework Wrote It in an Unknown Programming Language

The Duqu Trojan is one nasty piece of code, rivaled in sophistication only by its relative, the Stuxnet Worm. A new analysis of the Trojan, however, has revealed just how advanced it really is. Read More >>

military
Did the US Create the Conficker Virus to Wipe Out Iran’s Nukes?

The Conficker worm was one of the more intriguing and potentially destructive pieces of malware in the past decade. Earlier reports have suggested that Stuxnet was created by the US and Israeli governments, and now Reuters has a source telling them Conficker was also used to negate Iran's nuclear program. Read More >>

security
America’s Iran-Busting Cyber Bomb Was so Good It Looked like an Alien Weapon [Video]

Despite no official confirmation by the Pentagon, it's a very safe assumption that the US created the Stuxnet worm (with Israel's help) to take Iran's nuclear reactors offline. But when it was first discovered, it seemed too sophisticated for Earthlings. Read More >>