surveillance
Researchers Develop Tech That Lets Surveillance Cameras Text to Say Hello 

Researchers at Purdue University in America have found a new way to get surveillance cameras to “talk” to the people they see. The system is called PHADE, which stands for “private human addressing,” and it enables cameras to send messages to people’s devices when they’ve entered a specific area without collecting their personal data. Read More >>

surveillance
Australia Scraps Plans for National Biometric Crime Database

The Australian government is ending its plans for a national biometric database meant to help police departments track suspects and other persons of interest, the Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission announced Friday. Surveillance and security company NEC was awarded the contract in 2016, but after a third-party audit found the project had nearly doubled its budget, ACIC terminated the contact. Read More >>

china
China to Make RFID Chips Mandatory in Cars So the Government Can Track Citizens on the Road

The Chinese government, in its ongoing pursuit to create the dystopian police state dreamed up in many a science fiction tale, is reportedly readying a new vehicle identification system that will be capable of monitoring the movement of citizens. Read More >>

drones
DJI and Taser Maker Axon Are Teaming up to Make Police Drones

Last week, Axon announced it is partnering with drone-maker DJI to sell surveillance drones to U.S. police departments through a program dubbed “Axon Air.” The Taser and body camera manufacturer will work with DJI to offer drones linked to Evidence.com, Axon’s proprietary cloud-based data management system. The footage recorded by Axon’s body cameras is handled via the Evidence.com system. Read More >>

facebook
Facebook’s Data-Sharing Program for Phone Makers Included Chinese Telecom Giant Huawei

This past week, news broke in the New York Times that Facebook’s habit of giving extensive user data to third parties extended to “at least 60 device makers” who were granted access to private Facebook APIs over the past decade. The social media giant has been trying to quash the story by insisting developers were only allowed to use the data to provide “the Facebook experience” before the market dominance of Android and Apple made it less necessary for manufacturers to make custom apps, but a new development may have just made it a lot harder to sweep under the rug. Read More >>

surveillance
Indian College Puts Surveillance Cameras in Men’s Toilets to Deter Cheating

Law students in India were horrified to learn CCTV surveillance cameras had been installed in men’s bathrooms at Dharam Samaj Degree College. The college installed them in men’s toilets nearest the classrooms conducting entrance exams for law and business degrees. Read More >>

surveillance
Amazon’s Plan to Scan Your Face Even Has Police Worried It’s Too Creepy, New Emails Show

Across the country, law enforcement agencies are teaming up with data firms to bring facial recognition to public spaces, including airports, schools, and even protests. Most of these efforts remain clouded in secrecy, but newly released documents from Oregon officials using Amazon’s facial recognition offer our clearest look yet into how cops and their tech partners are massaging the ugly truths of facial recognition, including frequent mismatches, its use on people not suspected of crimes, and how to sell the public on something so obviously creepy — a task even police aren’t sure they’re up to. Read More >>

police
This Article From 1985 Predicted Deadly Force by Police Would Be ‘Nonexistent’ in the Future

When you imagine the American police officer of the future, what do you see? In the 1980s, one police officer saw “supercops” — a highly trained force of professionals who had the most high-tech toys at their disposal and almost never killed people. Read More >>

surveillance
Facial Recognition Still Doesn’t Work Like it Does in Films

Computers still aren't very good at recognising faces, according to research, which says that police use of facial recognition software is a massive waste of money and effort, and routinely results in randoms being plucked out of photographic databases. Read More >>

encryption
Email No Longer a Secure Method of Communication After Critical Flaw Discovered in PGP

If you use PGP or S/MIME for email encryption you should immediately disable it in your email client. Researchers have discovered a critical vulnerability they’re calling EFAIL that exposes the encrypted emails in plaintext, even for messages sent in the past. Read More >>

uncategorized
Australia Bans Cash For All Purchases Over £5,500 Starting July 2019

Australia’s Liberal Party government has announced that it will soon be illegal to purchase anything over $10,000 AUD (£5,500) with cash. The government says it’s, “encouraging the transition to a digital society,” and cracking down on tax evasion. But not everyone is happy with the move. Read More >>

police
Facial Recognition Used by Wales Police Has 90 Per cent False Positive Rate

According to the Guardian, the South Wales police scanned the crowd of more than 170,000 people who travelled to the nation’s capital for the football match between Real Madrid and Juventus. The cameras identified 2,470 people as criminals. Read More >>

surveillance
Companies in China Are Using Brain Sensors to Monitor Employees’ Emotions

Companies throughout China are using brainwave sensors to train workers and screen for mental fitness, South China Morning Post reports. More than a dozen factories are requiring workers to wear devices that use artificial intelligence to monitor their emotions. While officials say this saves money, the implications for workers are deeply troubling. Read More >>

privacy
Government Official Says It’s Too Expensive to Delete All the Mugshots of Innocent People in Police Databases

In 2012, a High Court ruling found that keeping the mugshots of innocent people in police databases was unlawful. But almost six years later, the Home Office has defended the continued retention of such images, saying, basically, the problem is too expensive to fix. Read More >>

facebook
Judge Clears Way for Major Class Action Suit Against Facebook Over Face Recognition

A US judge ruled last week that a class action lawsuit against Facebook over the company’s face recognition practices, with potentially millions of plaintiffs, can move forward to trial. Read More >>