science
How Our Bodies Sense the World is Misunderstood

Perhaps one of the first things you learned in kindergarten was that you had five senses: sight, taste, smell, hearing, and touch. But the actual number is probably way more than that, maybe in the 30s. And there’s a whole lot we don’t know about the senses that we do have. Read More >>

science
Coffee Could Be Changing Our Perception of Taste

Coffee seems to be the most overstudied beverage; seemingly every day we’re bombarded with another study about it causing or curing cancer. But surprisingly, there are plenty of scientists who don’t really understand its many effects. In fact, it may even be changing the way we taste all the other things we eat in a day, a new study suggests. Read More >>

food
Tech Offers a Way to Taste in VR

A group of researchers investigating the difficult -- but not exactly high priority for the survival of humankind -- issue of making people taste things over the internet claims to have made a breakthrough, with a system that uses heat variations to trick the taste buds into tasting things while licking a lump of technology that could, one day, take on the form of a porn star's genitals. Read More >>

food
Why Storing Tomatoes in the Fridge Is a Bad Idea

Most foodies warn against storing tomatoes in the fridge, saying it saps them of their flavour. New research confirms this culinary opinion, revealing the way cold temperatures prevent critical flavour-enhancing genes from doing their job. Read More >>

food
Taste Bud-Hacking Gadget Could Make Vegetables Taste Like Crisps

Scientists are working bravely away on hacking the body, hoping that a gadget might one day be able to fool our taste buds and therefore our brains into thinking that healthy food tastes just as nice as processed meats bathed in glorious salts and emulsifiers. Read More >>

food
The Problem With the New Chocolate Substitute is the Problem With All Food Substitutes

There’s a new form of chocolate out there that wants to replace confectionary as we know it. The reason it’s not going to is the same reason all substitute foods keep failing to deliver on their promises: accurately replicating food is almost impossible. Read More >>

booze
New Trick Helps Winemakers Figure Out Which Microbes Make Good Wine

Winemaking is always an exercise in uncertainty. You don’t really know just what the wine will taste like until the very end of the process, which is sometimes decades long. A new technique, however, could help predict what wine will taste like before it’s even made. Read More >>

food
Why are We Turning Our Favourite Foods Into Rainbow-Coloured Nightmares?

Recently, it seems like food dye is making a comeback in a big way, and not just one dye — all of them. Rainbow coloured bagels, cheese toasties, pizzas, and even lattes have circulated the internet as the latest food trend. Is it just harmless novelty, or is there more to these culinary monstrosities? Read More >>

science
No, Taking Your Coffee Black Does Not Mean You’re More Likely to be a Psychopath

Is that friend who always very politely turns down your offers for milk or sugar very possibly hiding a dark secret, as haters around the internet have been insisting recently? Nah, probably not—but here’s why some people are saying taking your coffee black means you’re more likely to be a psychopath. Read More >>

booze
This Artificial Tongue Can Taste the Tannins in Wine

Wine tasting notes are famous for their verbal flourishes—for example, "kirsch, dried beef and baker's chocolate,"—but the liquid is ultimately just a collection of molecules, some sour, some bitter, some dry. And we're getting better at quantifying taste. A newly developed artificial tongue uses the very proteins from our mouths to measure the dryness of wine. Read More >>

happy hour
A Weekend of Dark Beer With the World’s Greatest Stout Glass

It's just not fair: every single grape varietal and wine style, including some that no one has ever even heard of (Kalterer See Auslese, anyone?), has its own specially designed glass. Even Coca-Cola now has one. But, for beer, your standard mouth-delivery vehicle is the same, whether you're drinking the wateriest Bud Lite or a limited edition, quadruple-hopped, barrel-aged brew: either a shaker pint glass (so-called because it was designed for making martinis), or, if you're super classy, the bottle itself. Read More >>

food
The Futuristic Liquid Nitrogen Machine That Makes Ice Cream to Order

Despite the warm wood and cheery red accents, Smitten Ice Cream can feel a bit like a mad scientist's shop. There's the industrial-sized tank of liquid nitrogen that greets you inside the entrance of its new flagship location in Oakland. And there's the billowing clouds of nitrogen when the stainless steel ice cream machines churn out personalised scoops to order. Read More >>

science
Why Toothpaste Makes Things Taste So Awful

You may think it might be the common mint flavour of toothpaste clashing with other flavours, but in the case of orange juice and many other things, this isn't actually what's going on. The culprit here is thought to be two compounds almost universally added to toothpastes: sodium lauryl sulfate and sodium lauryl ether sulfate, which are anionic surfactants, meaning they lower the surface tension of water. Read More >>

giz explains
The Science Behind Why Fat Tastes So Good

It's the end of January, and that means New Year's resolutions swearing off chocolate and chips and all the other delicious fatty foods are just starting to bend. Who can blame you, really? Here's a rundown on the science of fat, and why it's so hard to resist. Read More >>